S u p p l e m e n t


115 WALLIS RD | LONDON | E9 5LN


 

The Drawing Room

Noémie Bablet
2 September - 15 October 2017

Private View: Friday 1st September 2017


Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Noémie Bablet
Pauline, 2017
HD Video, silent, 16’25’’

Installation view

Noémie Bablet
Untitled, 2015-17
Nail polish on paper, 30 x 23 cm

Noémie Bablet
Untitled, 2015-17
Marker on paper, 30 x 23 cm

Noémie Bablet
Untitled, 2015-17
Nail polish on paper, 30 x 23 cm

Noémie Bablet
Untitled, 2015-17
Nail polish on paper, 30 x 23 cm

Noémie Bablet
Untitled, 2015-17
Marker on paper, 30 x 23 cm

Noémie Bablet
Untitled, 2015-17
Marker on paper, 30 x 23 cm

Noémie Bablet
Untitled, 2015-17
Marker on paper, 30 x 23 cm

Noémie Bablet
Untitled, 2015-17
Nail polish on paper, 30 x 23 cm

Dike Blair
Untitled (Noémie), 2017
Gouache and pencil on paper, 25 x 18 cm

 


In the construction of the eighteenth century bourgeois home, the drawing room functioned as a threshold between the intimate space of the living room and the public space of the salon, the drawing room was used to withdraw with guests for more privacy.

Noémie Bablet’s first solo exhibition in London examines these ideas of intimacy, privacy and subjectivity. For The Drawing Room Bablet presents a display of intricate drawings accompanied by a short video portrait and a small painting of Bablet’s eye by the American painter Dike Blair.

Underpinning much of Bablet’s work are principles of reduction, of a diminished or subdued presence. As our lives become ever more public and our private spaces become harder to delineate or discern, then the idea of intimacy itself becomes complex, uncertain. It is a moment that feels increasingly necessary but also increasingly unreliable.

Running around the walls of the gallery are a set of drawings, modest in scale and delicate in technique. Many of the drawings contain a rectangle of colour, applied with marker pen or painted by pouring nail varnish onto the paper and then manipulating it with the nail varnish brush. These blocks are then bordered by a delicate grid of lines, fencing off the area. There is a tension as the reflective varnished and coloured surfaces push out of the work and the barely visible pencil lines draws the eye closer in. The rectangles of colour form a surface reminiscent of photographic negatives, and viewed as a whole the drawings begin to take on aspects of a photographic process, belying their handmade nature.

The exhibition includes two portraits, each addressing the act of looking. The first is a small painting of the artist’s eye by Dike Blair. The painting refers to the tradition of miniature paintings, which were historically given as gifts between loved ones. Intimate objects intended for private contemplation, they were rarely exhibited publicly. As Hanneke Grootenboer has remarked: ‘Eye portraits mark a knot in vision’s history. As symptoms, they may be quite telling regarding a general preoccupation, if not of their beholders or their owners, then of the wider culture that produced them: a preoccupation, obviously, with gazing, or rather with battling against the gaze.’

The second portrait is a short video of a friend, shot by Bablet. The video is casual and intuitive, there is no sound and the editing is minimal. The camera is an unblinking eye capturing a moment that feels simultaneously tender and voyeuristic. The gaze is mechanical, its implacability inevitably forcing our own gaze back in on itself as we watch.



Noémie Bablet (b. 1987, France) received a Master of Arts from the Université Paris 8 (2011) and graduated from the École Nationale Supérieure d’Arts de Paris-Cergy (2015). Recent projects include Bizoux an online project curated by Rosanna Puyol and Eloïse Bonneviot and a group show at Greylight Projects, Brussels (both 2017). Her research into the work of US-American artist Dike Blair resulted in an interview titled Privacy Lovers in 2014. The following year, Bablet received a grant to develop her practice at the Textile Arts Center in Brooklyn, NY, USA.

Supplement
115 Wallis Road
London
E9 5LN

The gallery is open Thursday - Saturday 12–6pm
& by appointment .

For further information please contact info@supplementgallery.co.uk